Category Archives: Essay

Pierre Huyghe: “UUmwelt,” the space between humanity

By Max Gruber, Swarthmore College   A torso with six eyes like robin’s egg shells is buffeted by a virtual breeze across a grainy, barren landscape. A rose-colored bulb props up a wrinkled yellow membrane flanked on each side by

Pierre Huyghe: “UUmwelt,” the space between humanity

By Max Gruber, Swarthmore College   A torso with six eyes like robin’s egg shells is buffeted by a virtual breeze across a grainy, barren landscape. A rose-colored bulb props up a wrinkled yellow membrane flanked on each side by

Review: Rachel Harrison, “Life Hack”

By India Halsted, Barnard College As part of JAC’s push to integrate more digital content in accordance with our 2020 journal theme, “New Media, New Messages,” we are thrilled to present this online-only exclusive. Here, our very own Events Coordinator,

Review: Rachel Harrison, “Life Hack”

By India Halsted, Barnard College As part of JAC’s push to integrate more digital content in accordance with our 2020 journal theme, “New Media, New Messages,” we are thrilled to present this online-only exclusive. Here, our very own Events Coordinator,

Deana Lawson’s Exalted Black Subjects

By Nicole-Ann Lobo, Columbia University. Originally published in the 2019 print edition. As a linguistic act, place-naming seems to tame spatial ambiguity by exerting a sense of ownership and control over a domain. But still there remain nameless places that

Deana Lawson’s Exalted Black Subjects

By Nicole-Ann Lobo, Columbia University. Originally published in the 2019 print edition. As a linguistic act, place-naming seems to tame spatial ambiguity by exerting a sense of ownership and control over a domain. But still there remain nameless places that

In Which Humanness Rests

By Oscar yi Hou, Columbia University. Originally published in the 2019 print edition. 1. Negative Space “My relationship to my paintings are like my relationships to people.” (Jennifer Packer, 2017)1 Subjects melt into red earth in Graces, a painting of

In Which Humanness Rests

By Oscar yi Hou, Columbia University. Originally published in the 2019 print edition. 1. Negative Space “My relationship to my paintings are like my relationships to people.” (Jennifer Packer, 2017)1 Subjects melt into red earth in Graces, a painting of

Lee Ufan and the Art of Margins

By Allison Yoo, Barnard College. Originally published in the 2019 print edition. Lee Ufan was a Korean-born artist, working primarily in Japan beginning in 1956.1 Throughout his career, Lee participated in multiple art movements, though he is most well known

Lee Ufan and the Art of Margins

By Allison Yoo, Barnard College. Originally published in the 2019 print edition. Lee Ufan was a Korean-born artist, working primarily in Japan beginning in 1956.1 Throughout his career, Lee participated in multiple art movements, though he is most well known

Mandalas and Black Holes: The Effects of the Flicker Film on Human Consciousness

By Jason Ooi, New York University Originally published in the 2019 print edition. An article from legendary avant-garde publication International Times contains some of the only discourse on Paul Sharits’s elusive film Ray Gun Virus (1966). Writer David Curtis begins

Mandalas and Black Holes: The Effects of the Flicker Film on Human Consciousness

By Jason Ooi, New York University Originally published in the 2019 print edition. An article from legendary avant-garde publication International Times contains some of the only discourse on Paul Sharits’s elusive film Ray Gun Virus (1966). Writer David Curtis begins

A Politics of Appearance

By Saikeerthi Rachavelpula Originally published in the 2019 print edition. Disquieted by the bulging eyes and gaping mouths of Swaihwe masks, Lévi-Strauss saw mythological representations not as isolated objects, but as aesthetic planes for the axes of life and death,

A Politics of Appearance

By Saikeerthi Rachavelpula Originally published in the 2019 print edition. Disquieted by the bulging eyes and gaping mouths of Swaihwe masks, Lévi-Strauss saw mythological representations not as isolated objects, but as aesthetic planes for the axes of life and death,

Friedel, Can You Hear Me?

By Blakey Bessire, Barnard College.   This is an image from page seven in David Wojnarowicz’s diary. It is page seven from his diary, labeled Human Head II, 1977, currently housed in the Fales Library collection at New York University.1

Friedel, Can You Hear Me?

By Blakey Bessire, Barnard College.   This is an image from page seven in David Wojnarowicz’s diary. It is page seven from his diary, labeled Human Head II, 1977, currently housed in the Fales Library collection at New York University.1

Relational Possibilities Beyond the Horizon Line

By Gianna Samms, Vassar College. — “[The horizon line] defined the limits of communication and understanding. Beyond the horizon, there was only muteness and silence. Within it, things could be made visible. But it could also be used for determining

Relational Possibilities Beyond the Horizon Line

By Gianna Samms, Vassar College. — “[The horizon line] defined the limits of communication and understanding. Beyond the horizon, there was only muteness and silence. Within it, things could be made visible. But it could also be used for determining

On the Chimeric Subject

By Aaron Su, Columbia University Originally published in the 2018 print edition. The question of selfhood has occupied a central problematic in nearly all the work of multidisciplinary queer artist and punk icon Vaginal Davis. Most notably, Davis is “the key

On the Chimeric Subject

By Aaron Su, Columbia University Originally published in the 2018 print edition. The question of selfhood has occupied a central problematic in nearly all the work of multidisciplinary queer artist and punk icon Vaginal Davis. Most notably, Davis is “the key